Events

Everyone must have a ticket to enter. Smoking is not permitted in any area of the MPAC.

Riverdance Wednesday, January 24 7:00 pm Tickets: $82, $72 Riverdance - The 20th Anniversary World Tour is composed by Bill Whelan, produced by Moya Doherty and directed by John McColgan. Riverdance - The 20th Anniversary World Tour will feature new costumes, new lighting, new projections and the addition of a brand new number, "Anna Livia," featuring the female members of the Irish dance troupe in an a cappella hard-shoe number. Tickets
The Black Jacket Symphony presents Led Zeppelin IV Friday, February 9, 2018 8:00 pm Tickets: $30, $25 Due to an unforeseen scheduling conflict with the venue, The Black Jacket Symphony’s performance of Led Zeppelin IV at the MPAC has been moved to Friday, February 9th. All tickets will be honored on the new date. For refunds, please contact the MPAC Box Office at 334-481-5100 or your original point of purchase. Tickets

Aaron Neville Quintet with special guests The Dirty Dozen Brass Band Sunday, February 11, 2018 7:30 pm Tickets: $63, $53, $43, $35 Until now, it's been easy to separate Aaron Neville's career into two separate but equal strains: the funky stuff he's favored when working with his esteemed band of brothers, and the angelic balladry you associate with him when he's punching his own time card as a solo artist. Casual fans might admit they don't know much -- to borrow a phrase -- about Neville's musical center, but they've perceived a certain split in his career. An education is about to be provided, then, in the form of Apache, a solo album that makes the case for Aaron Neville as the most holistic of soul men. Its hard R&B side matches anything the Neville Brothers ever recorded for true grit, while still allowing plenty of space for a singer who's arguably the most distinctive vocal stylist on the planet to tell it like it is.

Celebrating 40 years since their founding in 1977, New Orleans-based Dirty Dozen Brass Band has taken the traditional foundation of brass band music and incorporated it into a blend of genres including Bebop Jazz, Funk and R&B/Soul. This unique sound, described by the band as a musical gumbo, has allowed the Dirty Dozen to tour across 5 continents and 30 countries, record 12 studio albums and collaborate with a range of artists from Modest Mouse to Widespread Panic to Norah Jones. Forty years later, the Dirty Dozen Brass Band is a world famous music machine whose name is synonymous with genre-bending romps and high-octane performances.
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The Rising Star Road Show featuring Jamie Kent with Anthony Peebles and Tim Jackson Saturday, February 17, 2018 8:00 pm Tickets: $27, $17 The Rising Star Road Show is a tour celebrating and fostering the Rising Stars of the Southeast. Harkening back to the days when Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis took the world by storm, the Rising Star Road Show brings together the next big artists of multiple genres in front of one all star backing band, creating a dynamic, family friendly musical variety show. The Rising Star Road Show also invests in each community it visits, working with students and schools to foster the rising stars of the next generation through music and mentorship. For this concert the RSRS has partnered with Booker T. Washington Magnet High School and will be collaborating with their choir while raising money for their music program! Tickets
Jonny Lang Saturday, February 24, 2018 8:00 pm Tickets: $47, $37, $27, $23 Since the release of his debut album, Grammy Award winning Jonny Lang has built a reputation as one of the best live performers and guitarists of his generation. The path Lang has been on has brought him the opportunity to support or perform with some of the most respected legends in music. He has shared the stage with everyone from The Rolling Stones, B.B. King, Aerosmith and Buddy Guy, who he continues to tour with today.

Fans who discovered Jonny Lang through his searing instrumental work will revel in the huge guitar tones and go for broke solos on Signs , while those who have appreciated his growth as an honest and passionate songwriter will find that honesty and passion unabated. Though he long ago left blues purism behind, Lang has never abandoned its spirit of universal catharsis through the relating of personal trials. Signs reaffirms his commitment to the blues and the guitar without sacrificing the modern approach that has made him such a singular artist.
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Disney Junior Dance Party On Tour! Friday, March 23, 2018 6:00 pm Tickets: $52, $42, $35 Tickets
Here Come the Mummies Saturday, March 31, 2018 8:00 pm Tickets: $37, $32, $27, $17 Here Come the Mummies is an eight-piece funk-rock band of 5000 year-old Egyptian Mummies with a one-track mind. Their "Terrifying Funk from Beyond the Grave" is sure to get you into them. Since their discovery, HCTM has opened for P-Funk, Al Green, and Cheap Trick; rocked Super Bowl Village; become a regular on The Bob and Tom Show; played massive festivals like Summer Camp, Common Ground, Voodoo Fest, Musikfest, Summerfest, and Riverbend; and sold tickets by the thousands across large swaths of North America. Maybe that’s why the ladies (and some dudes) can’t stop losing their minds over these mayhem-inducing mavens of mirth. Some say they were cursed after deflowering a great Pharaoh’s daughter. Others claim they are reincarnated Grammy-Winning studio musicians. Regardless, HCTM’s mysterious personas, cunning song-craft, and unrelenting live show will bend your brain, and melt your face. Tickets
Rodney Carrington Saturday April 7, 2018 7:00 pm Tickets: $191.75, $41.75 Tickets
3Faces of the King Saturday, April 21, 2018 7:30 pm Tickets: $67, $52, $42, $37, $27 3 Faces of the King follows the most significant entertainer of all time through his most important musical eras.

The show opens in the early years of Elvis doing Rockabilly with the moves that scared the conservative nation. He jumped, wiggled and danced all over the stage…The nation could not believe what they saw. When he was on Ed Sullivan, they would only show him from the waist up as a conservative nation thought the moves to be risqué. The young people did not agree and Elvis Presley started a whole new genre of music

Elvis wanted to make movies. He talked the colonel, his manager into getting him movies. Except for a very few films, Elvis was not happy with the movies he was given..He wanted some serious films, but all the studio wanted to do is sell tickets, and having Elvis singing would do just that. However, after finishing one of his better films, King Creole, he was drafted into the United States Army. Elvis missed the excitement of live shows and was worried as to how people would still like his singing career.

The second phase of the show has Elvis, now a little older, taking a chance to do a television special originally called the Singer Special(singer sewing machines sponsored) and became known as the comeback special…It proved that Elvis had not lost it and the public still loved him. Elvis was back.

Following this, we move into the Vegas Years..It was the end of the 60’s and Elvis proved that he still had it in him..We create the excitement of the years in Las Vegas at the International Hotel.

The show is proud to welcome the AMBASSADOR BAND and the TCB HORNS along with the SWEET INSPIRATIONS and members of the STAMPS QUARTET.
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Veterans of Comedy - Bruce Bruce, Nephew Tommy and Jeremiah JJ Williamson Saturday April 28, 2018 8:00 pm Tickets: $89.50, $72.50, $68.50, $59.50 Davis Entertainment & Gentlemen Jack presents Veterans of Comedy Saturday April 28th (8:00 pm) at the Montgomery Performance Art Centre featuring some of legends of comedy Nephew Tommy from the Steve Harvey Morning Show, Straight out of Mississippi Comedian JJ and ATL Boss Bruce Bruce. Tickets
Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit with Special Guest Richard Thompson Sunday, May 6 8:00 pm Tickets: $58, $43.50, $30.50 Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit’s new album, The Nashville Sound, is a beautiful piece of American music-making, but watch yourself: it will light a fire under your ass. “You’re still breathing, it’s not too late,” Jason sings.

This album is a call, and the songs on it send sparks flying into a culture that’s already running so hot the needle on the temperature gauge is bouncing erratically in the red. And while it’s understandable that, in this moment, some people want their radio to help them drift away, this finely calibrated set of ten songs is aimed right between the clear eyes of people who prefer to stay present and awake. It’s a call to those who won't cower no matter how erratically the world turns, and who aren’t afraid of what looks back when they look in the mirror. Bruce Springsteen did that. Neil Young did that. Jason Isbell does that. There are songs on this album that cut to the chase. “Last year was a son of a bitch for nearly everyone we know,” Isbell sings on the album’s first single, “Hope the High Road.” “But I ain’t fighting with you down in the ditch. I’ll meet you up here on the road.” As singular as that lyric is, there’s nothing coy or obtuse about it. Meanwhile, other songs here take a subtler tack.

Check out track three, “Tupelo.” It plays like a warm ode to Northeast Mississippi—on the first few listens, it sure sounds like a loving tribute—but on the fourth you realize that the town the protagonist is extolling is actually a blazing hellhole. Perfect—as a hideout, anyway. “You get about a week of spring and the summer is blistering,” Isbell sings. “There ain’t no one from here who will follow me there.” It’s the kind of twist that compels the fifth listen—and the fiftieth. As with Isbell’s 2013 breakthrough, Southeastern, and his double-Grammy-winning follow up, 2015’s Something More Than Free, The Nashville Sound was produced by Dave Cobb. Isbell says that he and Cobb created a simple litmus test for the decisions they made in the two weeks they spent at RCA Studios (which was known as “The home of the Nashville Sound” back in the ’60’s and ’70s): they only made sonic moves that their heroes from back in the day could’ve made, but simply never did. It’s a shrewd approach—an honest way to keep the wiz-bang of modern recording technology at arms length, while also leaving the old bag of retro rock ’n’ roll tricks un-rummaged. Lyrically, The Nashville Sound is timely. Musically, it is timeless.

It’s also worth noting that this album isn’t credited to Isbell alone. For the first time since 2011’s Here We Rest, Isbell’s band, the 400 Unit, gets title billing. “Even when I was writing, I could always hear the band’s stamp on the finished product,” Jason says. “These songs needed more collaboration on the arrangements to make them work, and I felt like the band deserved it after the way they played.” Given Cobb’s strict insistence on cutting songs live with no demos or rehearsals, you can easily imagine how the brilliantly raw performances on the record will translate to the stage when the band takes these new songs out on the road. And boy, there’s nothing like a 400 Unit show. Not just because the band smokes, but also because Isbell’s fans are among music’s most ardent. They listen to these songs for months and months on their own, and that momentum rolls them right up to the doors at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, or the Beacon Theatre in New York or the Fabulous Fox Theatre in Atlanta. And when the band kicks in, they are ecstatic. It’s a rock ’n’ roll show that feels like fellowship. Which begs a question: Why do Jason’s songs strike us so deeply? What makes this music of the soul? The answer has to do with Jason’s authenticity, his intellect, his rootedness in both tradition (see: the childhood in Green Hill, Alabama, near Muscle Shoals, where he grew up picking and singing in the style he remembers here on “Something To Love”) as well as modernity (see: Jason singing about anxiety, or his complicated relationship to his iPhone). Simply put, Jason has a gift for taking big, messy human experiences and compressing them into badass little combustible packages made of rhythm, melody and madly efficient language. The songs are full of little hooks—it could be guitar line that catches one listener, or a quick lyric that strikes to the heart of another—and an act of transference takes place. The stories Jason tells become our own. The music is coming not from Jason and the band, but from within us. As you listen to this record, you will hear many themes: humor, heartache, wisdom, beauty, hope. But chief among them, strangely, is leadership. If Southeastern (2013) was the Getting Sober record (Jason has been searingly honest in both songs and interviews about the time he spent in rehab), and Something More Than Free (2015) was the New Clarity record, maybe this one, The Nashville Sound, is the Way Forward.

And who better to lead us forward than Jason Isbell? Jason is a relentless and fearless selfinterrogator. (The first line of “Cumberland Gap”—“There’s an answer here if I look hard enough”—will be familiar to those who know him.) And this album is a challenge, a gauntlet in song: Let’s claim ownership of our biases (“White Man’s World”). Let’s embrace and celebrate the uncomfortable idea that the force that activates both life and love is death (the instantclassic “If We Were Vampires”). Let’s consciously choose light over darkness (“Hope the High Road”). And for God’s sake, if you are feeling anxious, alone, disenfranchised, depressed, mad as hell, or scared as shit, find something that gasses you up and work at it (“Something to Love”). Jason, it seems, after years grinding the rail that separates terra firma from the brink, has put in the sweat equity it takes to hug it out with his demons and fill his life with meaning, bright and clean. If that sounds good to you, this album lights the path.
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Three Dog Night Friday, May 11 8:00 pm Tickets: $92, $62, $47, $37 Legendary music icons, THREE DOG NIGHT, are celebrating nearly 5 decades of hits! Their songs wind through the fabric of pop culture today, whether on the radio where they are heard day in and day out, in TV commercials or in major motion pictures — songs like “Mama Told Me (Not To Come)”, “Joy to the World”, “Black and White”, “Shambala” and “One” serve to heighten our emotions and crystallize THREE DOG NIGHT’s continuing popularity.

Boasting chart and sales records that are virtually unmatched in popular music, THREE DOG NIGHT had 21 consecutive Top 40 hits, including 3 #1 singles, 11 Top 10’s, 18 straight Top 20’s, 7 million-selling singles and 12 straight RIAA Certified Gold LPs. Tens of millions of THREE DOG NIGHT records have been sold through the years. Since 1986, they have performed over 2,200 shows including two Super Bowls.
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Delbert McClinton Saturday, May 12, 2018 8:00 pm Tickets: $37, $32, $27, $23 There are two kinds of people in the world: those who love Delbert McClinton and those who haven’t heard him yet. Delbert is always working on that second group.The multi-Grammy Award winning artist is at the top of his game with his 19th studio album, Prick Of The Litter (Hot Shot Records/Thirty Tigers). The new offering captures the balance of soulful energy and restraint that the legendary performer has been delivering in his live performances for decades all over the world. On Prick of the Litter, Delbert incorporates a variety of styles, and as always, just enough to keep him comfortably outside the traditional marketing categories. Tickets
Happy Together Tour 2018 The Turtles featuring Flo and Eddie
Chuck Negron formerly of Three Dog Night
Gary Puckett and the Union Gap
The Association
Mark Lindsay former Lead Singer of Paul Revere & The Raiders
The Cowsills
Saturday, June 9, 2018 7:30 pm Tickets: $85, $75, $55, $45, $35 This an evening of hit after hit...after HIT! You will go home whistling the soundtrack of the 60’s and 70’s! Starring The Turtles featuring Flo & Eddie, Chuck Negron formerly of Three Dog Night, Gary Puckett and The Union Gap, Mark Lindsay former lead singer of Paul Revere & The Raiders, The Association and The Cowsills. Tickets
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